Monday, January 26, 2015

The Luxury of Listening: Storytelling Podcasts

A Midsummer's Night Dream
by
Arthur Rackham, 1908
Recently, storyteller Allison Cox asked our colleagues on the Storytell listserv to share some of their favorite podcast sites. Below is a list of suggestions, along with additional links to stories that regularly stream live on radio stations.

While there is no substitute for a live performance, watching and hearing a storyteller weave their magic right before your eyes, these podcasts are certainly treasures in their own right.

I am sure your will find many wonderful stories among the many links below to brighten your days!




Podcasts and Radio Shows



The Art of Storytelling Show
http://www.artofstorytellingshow.com/

Everything is Stories
eisradio.org

The Moth 
http://themoth.org/


Porchlight Storytelling Series
http://porchlight.libsyn.com/


Stories of the Journey Home
http://www.storiesofthejourneyhome.com/

StoryCorps 

http://storycorps.org/

Tell a Tale


This American Life
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/


World of Storytelling
http://www.live365.com/index.live

 
Many thanks to Allison for asking the question and to the following storytellers for sharing the information:

Wendy Gourley
Jenni Cargill-Strong
Richard Martin
Ingrid Nixon
Nick Smith
Michael Williams


 

 

Karen Chace 2015 ©

Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Following the Breadcrumbs XXIII: Stor e Telling March April 2006

Hansel and Gretel in the Forest
by
Paul Hermann Wagner, 1852
I am traveling back in time and updating all of my Stor e Telling columns for Storytelling Magazine since 2002. I have checked all of the links, updated those that have new URL's and deleted others that have found their way to the Internet graveyard. Through the summer and beyond I will continue to update the columns and post them on my blog until all of the breadcrumbs lead to the end of 2006. At the end of the blog you will find links to the columns from 2002 - 2004 and 2007 - 2013.

I continue to write for Storytelling Magazine but will not be adding current columns until the following year. If you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network and support the arts!  Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful. 
 
Alexander Technique
Our most important instrument is our voice, and many outside forces, including stress and those dreaded springtime allergies can impact it negatively. The technique can help you maintain your voice, and this site is good starting point if you wish to delve deeper into this method.
http://www.alexandertechnique.com/

March is Woman’s Natural History Month. If you are developing a storytelling venue on women throughout history these sites will be a valuable resource.

American Women Through Time
A historic chronology with links to relevant websites for each period, along with research sources appropriate for the specified time period.
http://www.mtsu.edu/~kmiddlet/history/women/wh-timeline.html

Women’s History Links
Information on notable woman who took part in the Gold Rush, Aviation, Science, Medicine and more. Note: The original site is no longer available but you may still access an amazing array of resources via the Wayback Machine link below.
https://web.archive.org/web/20040604144502/http://www.suelebeau.com/women.htm

Canku Ota (Many Paths)
A collection of native stories from many tribes. There are also discussion questions and information at the end of some of the tales, which makes this a wonderful site for educators as well.
http://www.turtletrack.org/CO_Indices/CO_Index_Story.htm

Tales of the Daoine Sidhe - Folktales of Ireland
Pronounced deenie shee, and meaning the good people, this site lives up to its name with numerous stories about the lovely lads and lassies in legend and lore from Ireland. Pour yourself a good cup of Irish tea, sit back and revel in the magic of the Emerald Isle.
Note: The original site is no longer available but you may still access an amazing array of resources via the Wayback Machine link below.
https://web.archive.org/web/20060903110526/http://home.iprimus.com.au/sidhe/sidhe.html

 
These websites stretch the boundaries of traditional storytelling.

Center for Digital Storytelling
This California arts organization assists “young people and adults in using the tools of digital media to craft, record, and share the stories of individuals and communities, in ways that improve all our lives.” 
http://www.storycenter.org/

Informative list of fringe festivals in the USA and beyond.

United States Association of Fringe Festivals 
http://fringefestivals.us/festival/index.html

The World Fringe Alliance
http://www.worldfringealliance.com/

Tech Head Stories
A plethora of digital storytelling websites highlighting corporate storytelling, personal, educational and historic journals, along with teaching tools for digital storytelling. There is also a good collection of traditional story resources as well.
Note: The original site is no longer available but you may still access an array of resources via the Wayback Machine link below.
https://web.archive.org/web/20060203211259/http://tech-head.com/dstory.htm 

 
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

2002 – 2004

Stor e Telling Columns -
All 16 blog bogs, with a brief synopsis for reach one in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/stor-e-telling-resources-2002-2004.html


2005

January February Fables from Aesop and Robert Lewis Stevenson, spooky stories in time for Halloween, resources sponsored by the California Council for the Humanities, myths and legends from the British Isles and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-xvi-stor-e.html

March April
 -  Sites on Buddhist Studies, Cambodian folktales, lesson plans, public domain music from a variety of cultures, myths, legends and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html

May June - There are resources for song lyrics, lessons plans connected to our historical parks in the USA, Hodja, Birbel and Jakata stories, over 544 dragon tales and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xviii-stor-e.html 

July August - Ballad and folk songs resources from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and America. Also, resources on Hans Christian Anderson, sea songs and shanties, and a list of contact information for state and regional art councils and agencies.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xix-stor-e.html

September October - Links to Victorian Ghost Stories, folklore and legends from around the world, children’s activities to complement your storytelling programs, and Hodja tales. For the classroom, Beyond the Fire offers real-life stories of 15 teenagers, now living in the U.S., who have survived war in seven war zones, along with lesson plans and timelines.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xx-stor-e-telling.html

November December - Christmas stories and other Yuletide offerings, stories to celebrate Kwanzaa, Hasidic tales and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/12/following-breadcrumbs-xxi-stor-e.html

2006
January February
Interesting links for Black History Month, tales from Celtic lore, stories of magical mermaids, sites to sweeten your Valentine's Day, contact information for libraries in the USA, and Europe (summer reading programs are just around the corner!) and more. 
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2015/01/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html


2007 - 2012

Stor e Telling Columns 2007-2012

All 31 blog posts, along with a brief synopsis for each one, in an easy to access post at the link below
.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html 


2013

From 1001 Night to 2001 Story Resources
 – This link will lead to you one blog post with all of my columns from 2013.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/06/from-1001-nights-to-2001-story.html

  

Karen Chace 2015 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

 

 

Monday, January 5, 2015

Following the Breadcrumbs XXII: Stor e Telling January February 2006



Hansel

by Hermann Kaulbach

1846-1909
I am traveling back in time and updating all of my Stor e Telling columns for Storytelling Magazine since 2002. I have checked all of the links, updated those that have new URL's and deleted others that have found their way to the Internet graveyard. Through the summer and beyond I will continue to update the columns and post them on my blog until all of the breadcrumbs lead to the end of 2006. At the end of the blog you will find links to the columns from 2002 - 2004 and 2007 - 2013.

I continue to write for Storytelling Magazine but will not be adding current columns until the following year. If you want immediate access to the newest websites, consider becoming a member of the 
National Storytelling Network and support the arts!

Please feel free to comment on the blog and let me know if you find this useful; I love to hear from you!


February is Black History month. Will you be offering a theme related storytelling program? Here are three websites that bring the pages of history to life.


Education First – Black History Activities
http://tommarch.com/webquests/BHM/AfroAm.html

The History Channel
Video clips, great speeches, resources and more.
http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/black-history-month

Infoplease
History, timelines, contemporary issues, etc., a valuable link for anyone researching Black History.
http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhm1.html

In The First Person              
Over 2,500 collections of oral history from around the world: personal narratives, letters, diaries, memoirs, autobiographies, and oral histories; a goldmine of information.
http://www.inthefirstperson.com/firp/index.shtml

Celtic Literature Collective
(Previously The House of Bards)
Another treasure trove of tales; medieval texts from Celtic countries or on Celtic themes.
http://www.maryjones.us/index.html

Mermaids on the Web

Listen to their call; this site offers you more than 1,720 resources about mermaids, selkies and sirens.
http://www.isidore-of-seville.com/mermaids/index.html

Panchatantra

The original text was written in Sanskrit about 200 B.C. Now you can read the tales in English. The stories have been grouped into five distinct themes.
http://panchatantra.org/panchatantra-stories.html

Folklife Resources for Educators
From the American Folklife Center an array materials related to documentation and field research.  
http://www.loc.gov/folklife/teachers/index.html

Break out those mailing labels! It’s not too early to start thinking about your summer storytelling programs. Here are three websites that offer contact information on libraries in the USA and beyond. Ready, set, go!

LIBWEB 
http://www.lib-web.org/

Public Libraries.com
http://www.publiclibraries.com/

Public Libraries of Europe  
http://www.lib-web.org/europe/

What Valentine’s Day would be complete without some love stories to share? From the cities of love and lights, offerings from the SurLaLune website by Giambattista Basile and Charles Perrault.
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/pentamerone/
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/authors/perrault.html

Greek Mythology - Seven beautiful, yet tragic love stories.
http://thanasis.com/love.htm

Need a little trivia to sweeten up your Valentine’s Day storytelling venues?

The History of Valentine’s Day
From the History Channel, enough inside information on romance to make you swoon.
http://www.history.com/topics/valentines-day/history-of-valentines-day

Esther Howland – Mother of the American Valentine
“The story of one visionary, whose talent, imagination, dedication, and perseverance created a fascinating industry….”
http://telebody.com/valentines/howland.htm 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

S
tor e Telling Columns 2002 – 2004
All 16 blog bogs, with a brief synopsis for reach one in an easy to access post at the link below.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/stor-e-telling-resources-2002-2004.html

2005

January February
 
Fables from Aesop and Robert Lewis Stevenson, spooky stories in time for Halloween, resources sponsored by the California Council for the Humanities, myths and legends from the British Isles and more.

March April
 -  Sites on Buddhist Studies, Cambodian folktales, lesson plans, public domain music from a variety of cultures, myths, legends and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/10/following-breadcrumbs-stor-e-telling.html

May June - There are resources for song lyrics, lessons plans connected to our historical parks in the USA, Hodja, Birbel and Jakata stories, over 544 dragon tales and more.
http://www.karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xviii-stor-e.html

July August - Ballad and folk songs resources from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and America. Also, resources on Hans Christian Anderson, sea songs and shanties, and a list of contact information for state and regional art councils and agencies.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xix-stor-e.html

September October - Links to Victorian Ghost Stories, folklore and legends from around the world, children’s activities to complement your storytelling programs, and Hodja tales. For the classroom, Beyond the Fire offers real-life stories of 15 teenagers, now living in the U.S., who have survived war in seven war zones, along with lesson plans and timelines.http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/11/following-breadcrumbs-xx-stor-e-telling.html

November December
- Christmas stories and other Yuletide offerings, stories to celebrate Kwanzaa, Hasidic tales and more.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/12/following-breadcrumbs-xxi-stor-e.html


2007 - 2012
Stor e Telling Columns 2007-2012
All 31 blog posts, along with a brief synopsis for each one, in an easy to access post at the link below
.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html 

2013
From 1001 Night to 2001 Story Resources – This link will lead to you one blog post with all of my columns from 2013.

 
Karen Chace 2015 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.




Friday, January 2, 2015

Here's to Fairytales and Happily Ever After!

The Damsel Sat Behind Behind His Pillow
from Russian Fairy Tales
Illustrator: Noel L. Nisbet, 1915
Welcome 2015!

This is my first blog post as we make our way into the New Year. Since the most important wish on my list is that the coming year be filled with happiness for all, I thought it would be appropriate to share some fairytales.


The first half of this blog contains fun for the little ones, finger plays, etc., and the second half offers hundreds of public domain folktales to ensure that we live “Happily ever after!”

If you have the time and the inclination, I would love it if you would comment on the blog below and let me know if you find this work useful. (Note: If you do comment, it will not be posted until approved.)

COUNTING AND FINGERPLAYS

Where Is The Royal Family? To the tune of “Where is Thumbkin?

Where is the King? Where is King?
Here I am! Here I am!
How are you today, Sir?
Very well, I thank you.
Run away. Run away.

Where is the Queen? Where is the Queen?
Here I am! Here I am!
How are you today, mame?
Very well, I thank you.
Run away. Run away.

Where is the Prince? Where is the Prince?
Here I am! Here I am!
How are you today, Sir?
Very well, I thank you.
Run away. Run away.

Where is the Princess? Where is the Princess?
Here I am! Here I am!
Very well, I thank you.
Run away. Run away.

Where is the royal baby? Where is the royal baby?
Here I am! Here I am!
How are you today baby?
Very well, I thank you.
Run away. Run away.



Five Little Dragons

Five little dragons with great big scales
One lost his balance and bumped his tail
He cried ouch and breathed some fire
And then flew away higher and higher
Repeat for remaining count 4, 3, 2, 1
From Storytime Magic
 
SONG

Baa Baa Black Sheep

Baa, baa, black sheep,
Have you any wool?
Yes sir, yes sir,
Three bags full

One for my master
And one for the dame,
And one for the little boy
Who lives down the lane.

Baa Baa black sheep have you any wool
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full.

The Jazzy Three Bears
In a wee little house in the forest lived the Three Bears.
One was the Papa Bear, one was the Mama Bear, one was the wee bear.
One day they were walking through the deep woods a’talkin
when along, along, along came a little girl with golden hair, and her name was Goldilocks, and upon the door she knocked, but no one was there;  no, no, no no one was there

So she walked right in had herself a ball,
no she didn’t care, no no no she didn’t care.
And when she got tired she went upstairs

Home, home, home came the Three Bears
“Someone’s been eating my porridge” said the Papa Bear, Humph!
“Someone’s been eating my porridge” said the Mama Bear.
“Hey baba re bear,” said the little Wee Bear, someone has broken my chair! Crash! (clap)

Up woke Goldilocks broke up the story and beat it out of there,
yeah she beat it out of there.

“Hey bye bye,” said the Papa Bear
“Hey bye, bye,” said the Momma Bear
“Hey baba re bear,” said the Little Wee Bear

 And that’s the story of the Three Little Bears
Na   na   na    na   na   na    na   na  na  na  Cha!

This is a great jazz video from 1947. Watch the Page Cavanaugh Trio performing The Jazzy Three Bears. While some of the words are a bit different you can get sense the flavor and the fun! My young audiences (and their parents) love this story!




STORY STRETCH

Here Is The…

Here is the prince with his feathered cap, (take off hat, bow)
Here are his boots which go tap, tap, tap. (tap toes)
Here is the princess with her golden crown, (put four fingers up over head)
Here is her lovely beaded gown. (curtsy)
Here is their castle tall and wide, (stretch arms up to the sky)
Where the prince and princess play safely inside. (jump up and down)


ADDITIONAL STORIES, SONGS AND CRAFTS

DLTK-Teach.com – This page will lead you to a number of well-known fairytales with crafts to complement the stories, nursery rhymes and songs. Lots of fun to add to your programs!

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES                                 

Below are three blog posts I wrote containing public domain fairytales.


Celebrate Tell a Fairy Tale Day II
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/02/celebrate-tell-fairy-tale-day-ii.html

Wisdom, Wit and Wonder: Fabulous Fairy Tales
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2011/12/wisdom-wit-and-wonder-fabulous-fairy.html


Karen Chace 2015 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Chinese New Year 2015: Celebrate the Year of the Sheep

Su Wu , The Lonely Shepherd
by

Ren Bonian, 1840- 1895
February 19, 2015 begins the Year of the Sheep according to the Chinese Zodiac. (Also recognized as the Year of the Ram or the Year of the Goat)
In Ancient China the sheep symbolized justice. According to legend a divine sheep called xiezhi was able to recognize wrongdoers, and would gore them in punishment. Judges wore and images of the xiezhi on their hats as a symbol of impartiality.



In Guangzhou, China, there is a statue commemorating the Five Sheep. It is said that the people used to eat only fish, until five gods came to earth riding on five sheep. Each sheep was a different color and held an ear of rice in its mouth.  The gods instructed the people to plant the rice and blessed the city against famine. The gods flew back to the sky but the sheep remained standing until they became stones. Guangzhou is nicknamed “Five Sheep City”, and all sheep are believed to be lucky.

Above information from the following sites:
http://www.chinaculture.org/gb/en_madeinchina/2005-10/21/content_74782_14.htm
http://waypastnormal.blogspot.com/2012/04/sheep-in-legend-and-lore-special-joint.html

Since different sites state it is the year of the sheep, goat or ram, I offer you stories on all of these wonderful creatures.

SHEEP

Anyone that can walk three circles around a sleeping sheep will get his wish. 
                                                                                           ~ Icelandic Folklore

The Hyena and the Sheep - Somalia
http://hooyo.web.free.fr/E_tale_13.html

The Lion, the Cow, the She-Goat and the Sheep - Aesop
http://www.mythfolklore.net/aesopica/oxford/14.htm

The Sharp, Grey Sheep – Gaelic/West Highlands
http://www.surlalunefairytales.com/cinderella/stories/sheep.html

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://oaks.nvg.org/ntales47.html

The Sheep, the Lamp, the Wolf and the Hare - Tibet
http://members.home.nl/marcmarti/yugur/folktale/tale10b.htm

The Shepherd’s Mistake - India

http://mocomi.com/indian-folk-tales-the-shepherds-mistake/

The Sky is Falling - Ethiopia

Why the Stork Eats Frogs and the Wolf Hunts Sheep - Ukraine

http://www.4to40.com/folktales/print.asp?p=Why_The_Stork_Eats_Frogs_And_The_Wolf_Hunts_Sheep


RAM

The Goat and the Ram - Russia
http://whisperingbooks.com/Show_Page/?book=Russian_Folk_Tales&story=Goat_And_Ram 

The Tiger, the Ram and the Jackal – South Africa
http://www.sacred-texts.com/afr/saft/sft06.htm


The Ram and the Pig Who Set Up House - Norway
http://hazel.forest.net/whootie/stories/ram_pig_house_norway.html

The Wolves, the Sheep and the Lamb – Aesop
http://www.mythfolklore.net/aesopica/oxford/31.htm

GOAT


The Dog, the Goat and the Donkey – Ethiopia
http://www.ethiopianfolktales.com/en/somalia/210-the-dog-the-goat-and-the-donkey

The Goat-Face Girl – Andrew Lang
http://www.readbookonline.net/readOnLine/4890/

The Lad With the Goat Skin - Celtic
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/cft/cft29.htm

The Sheep, the Goat and the Dog – Chad
http://www.tchad.org/research/folktales.html#truck

Three Billy Goat’s Gruff – Three versions: Norway, Poland, Germany
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/type0122e.html

When the Hyena and the Billy Goat Signed a Peace Treaty – Chad
http://www.tchad.org/research/folktales.html#peace

CRAFTS

A number of easy, preschool sheep/lamb crafts and activities.

DLTK-KIDS 
http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/lambs.htm

Danielle’s Place
http://www.daniellesplace.com/html/sheepcrafts.html

 CURRICULUM

First School – Preschool goat themed activities.
Sheep and Lamb
http://www.first-school.ws/theme/animals/farm/lamb.htm
Goat
http://www.first-school.ws/activities/animals/farm/goat.htm


ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The Chinese New Year ends with the Lantern Festival, celebrated at night with displays and parades of painted lanterns. The highlight of the Lantern Festival is the Dragon Dance. Beautiful dragons made of paper, silk and bamboo are held overhead, and appear to dance as they make their way along the parade routes.

Storybug.net: Dragons - Mythical, Mystical, Magical Creatures! – Here is a previous blog post filled with dragon tails, curriculum, crafts and more to augment your Chinese New Year celebration.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2011/05/dragons-mythical-mystical-magical.html 


Below are previous blog posts I wrote for the Chinese New Year. You will find useful background information to augment your Chinese New Year programs.

Year of the Horse
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/chinese-new-year-year-of-horse.html

Year of the Snake
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/12/celebrate-chinese-new-year-2013-year-of.html

Year of the Tiger
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2009/12/2010-year-of-tiger.html 

Gung Hay Fat Choy
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2008/02/gung-hay-fat-choy.html

Last year I wrote a blog for the end of March: March Goes Out  Like a Lamb. Since lambs are baby sheep I thought you might find something to add to your Chinese New Year Program here.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/03/march-goes-out-like-lambfolktales-and.html

Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.