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Thursday, April 10, 2014

Stor e Telling: October November December 2013

All the Newspapers in the World
by Edmund Dulac, 1911
Last year I undertook the project of placing all of my 2007-2012 Stor e Telling columns, from Storytelling Magazine on my blog. Now that 2014 is here I will begin to share all of my columns from 2013. I will not be adding current columns until the following year, so if you want immediate access to the newest websites, please consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network. 

Below are the sites I offer for the October/November/December 2013 issue. October is apple picking time in the USA so there is a basketful of apple tales and of course, resources for Halloween. In addition, November is National Novel Writing Month so there are sites with information to help you travel the publishing road, along with stories to celebrate Thanksgiving and Christmas. I hope you find something to add to your repertoire.


Building Your Book for Kindle – This is a free Kindle download from Amazon.com.  You may view the table of contents at the link.
http://tinyurl.com/mbmd46q

How to Publish Short Stories – Seven steps to start you on the road to adding 'author' to your resume.
http://tinyurl.com/mobpsrv 

How to Successfully Self-Publish a Kindle eBook – “You have everything you need to start sharing your message today—fingers, keyboard, and the Internet.” Writer and blogger and Jeff Goins’ breaks it down in five easy sections.
http://tinyurl.com/lbkuako

How to Write a Non-fiction Book Proposal –This article shares information on book outlines, specifications, author information and more to help you get it right the first time. http://tinyurl.com/maxh8fw

Independent Publishers and University Presses – From A – Z a list of book publishers, mainly from the U.S. and Canada.
http://www.newpages.com/book-publishers/

Online Book Publishing – A 2013 chart comparing 10 of the best online book publishing companies and their services.
http://tinyurl.com/lkyys7q

Top Ten Frequently Asked Questions About Children’s Book Publishing by Robin Michal Koontz, SCBWI Regional Advisor.
http://www.scbwisocal.org/htmls/FAQs.htm


In some parts of the United States autumn means its apple picking time. I offer you some stories to complement the season.

The Apples of the Hesperides - A Greek Myth. The eleventh tale from the Twelve Labors of Hercules.
http://tinyurl.com/k8syyjr

A Boy and His Donkey - Hispanic Southwest
http://tinyurl.com/lwttvus 

The Apple of Contentment by Howard Pyle
http://tinyurl.com/m38e7tl

The Enchanted Apple Tree - France
Another version of this story is "Tia Miseria's Pear Tree," a story from Puerto Rico.
http://tinyurl.com/kxrt29h

The Griffin – Germany
http://tinyurl.com/l4oddl8

The Twelve Months – Russia
http://russian-crafts.com/tales/12months.html

The Glass Mountain – Polish
http://tinyurl.com/mbh5q6h

The Golden Apples and the Nine Pea Hens – Serbia
http://tinyurl.com/mpyratm

Story-Lovers.com - Information and story suggestions from the fabulous Jackie Baldwin.
http://tinyurl.com/lztfrd

The Tale of the Three Apples from the Arabian Nights
http://tinyurl.com/n3d99fx

The Laughing Apple and the Weeping AppleTurkey
http://tinyurl.com/m59oe3r


Halloween is here! Some tales to fright and delight your audiences.

Can Such Things Be? Short, spine tingling tales, published in 1910, to add to your storytelling repertoires from 1910.
http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/4366

Story-Lovers.com - Jackie Baldwin stirs up a witches' brew of stories ideas. Check out the Halloween Bare Bones book, the perfect addition to your library!
http://tinyurl.com/kfwzcmh


Don’t forget to bring some Halloween fun into the classroom!

Halloween  Games for the Classroom - “A collection of fun and educational Halloween games that build math and language skills for grades K-5.
http://tinyurl.com/ya4hn36

Three multicultural tales to celebrate my favorite holiday, Thanksgiving.

The Circle of Life and the Clambake  A Native American  story from the Wampanoag culture that encompasses the spirit of thanksgiving, the circle of life and caring for the earth.http://tinyurl.com/kpdyaq

The Magic of Muskil Gusha Iran
http://www.aaronshep.com/stories/048.html

The Scarecrow’s Thanksgiving – Canada
http://tinyurl.com/y9ulwob


A plethora of all things Christmas piled high under the tree.

World of Christmas
Twenty-two tales and information on Christmas symbols and superstitions.
http://www.worldofchristmas.net/christmas-stories/

The link below will take you to all of the Stor e Telling blog posts, with synopses, from my 2007-2012 columns for the national Storytelling Magazine.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

Let me know if you find this useful; I love to hear from you ; feel free to share the link to the post. Please note that if you comment on the blog below it will not appear until I allow it to be published. Sadly, I had to implement that fail safe to avoid spam messages from being published. Thank you for understanding. 

 

Karen Chace 2014 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Stor e Telling: August September 2013


Prince Florimund finds the Sleeping Beauty
from
Childhood Favorites and Fairy Stories,
1907
Last year I undertook the project of placing all of my 2007-2012 Stor e Telling columns, from Storytelling Magazine on my blog. Now that 2014 is here I will begin to share all of my columns from 2013. I will not be adding current columns until the following year, so if you want immediate access to the newest websites, please consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network. 

Below are the sites I offer for the August September 2013 issue; the theme for that issue was Fairy Tales so you will find some wonderful articles and stories to complement the theme. I hope you find something fun to tell!

 



"Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." ~ C. S. Lewis

 
Articles on Fairytales

All Things Considered by G. K. Chesterton's, 1908.  There are a variety of essays in this book, including one on fairytales.
http://tinyurl.com/kkyqugf 

The Endicott Studio Journal of Mythic ArtsTwenty-one articles on Animal Brides and Bridegrooms, Beauty and the Beast, Baba Yaga and many more.
http://tinyurl.com/k7mak2f

Sources for the Analysis and Interpretation of Folk and Fairy Tales - Resources on the analysis of fairy or folk tales, from literary and psychological traditions. http://www.folkandfairy.org/

 
You’re sure to find some fabulous fairytales to add to your repertoire in the links below.

 
The Cat and the Mouse, A Book of Persian Fairy Tales by Hartwell James, 1906. Four fairytales from this beautiful land.
http://tinyurl.com/lrhcz9o

Cossack Fairy Tales and Folktales by Robert Nisbet Bain, 1902 – Bain collected these folktales from Ruthenian, the language of the Cossacks, a language intermediate between Russian and Polish. The Iron Wolf, The Golden Slipper, The Tsar and the Angel and The Story of the Forty-First Brother are just a few of the unique stories found within these cyber pages.
http://tinyurl.com/2uklns8

Czechoslovak Fairy Tales by Parker Fillmore, 1919. “The old king reached into his pocket, drew out a golden key, and handed it to the prince.” So begins the story of Longshanks, Girth and Keen, one of the many tales that await you within.
http://tinyurl.com/baw8ysh

Fairy Legends of the French Provinces by Martha Ward Carey, 1887 – Thirty-four stories filled with charm and enchantment.
http://tinyurl.com/be5ly4j

Forty-Four Turkish Fairy Tales by Ignácz Kúnos, 1913 - Be whisked away to the magical land of Turkey and meet the Wizard and His Pupil, Prince Ahmed, The Silent Princess and other fascinating creatures. The text also offers the English definition of the Turkish words used in the text.
http://tinyurl.com/8vtcwx

The Golden Maiden and Other Folk Tales and Fairy Stories Told in Armenia by A.G. Seklemian. Twenty-nine stories including The Bride of the Fountain, The Trove of Destiny and The Maiden of the Sea, just a few enchanted tales you will find between the pages of this book from 1898.
http://tinyurl.com/mcgynac

Old English Fairy Tales by Sabine Baring-Gould, 1906. Robert the Evil, The Badger in the Bag, The Undutiful Daughter and others are waiting to delight you!
http://tinyurl.com/89j85d3

Serbian Fairy Tales by Elodie L. Muatovich, 1918. Seeking some longer stories to share? This book offers a number of tales in three, four and six parts.
http://tinyurl.com/aqer7bc

Swedish Fairy Tales by Herman Hofbert, 1890. Stories of trolls, elves, sea maidens and giants await.
http://tinyurl.com/ld6b7lh

Celebrate with Tell a Fairy Tale DayThis link will lead you to a blog post I wrote on fairy tales in 2012. There are a number of stories and public domain books from around the globe, and also links to curriculum and crafts.
http://tinyurl.com/kapa47k

Miscellaneous

Beacons in the Night: Lighthouse Keepers, Legend and Lore – Stories, curriculum and crafts, all connected to the many beautiful lighthouses around the globe.
http://tinyurl.com/pnfxfnr


The link below will take you to all of the Stor e Telling blog posts, with synopses, from my 2007-2012 columns for the national Storytelling Magazine.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

Let me know if you find this useful; I love to hear from you! Please note that if you comment on the blog below will not appear until I allow it to be published. Sadly, I had to implement that fail safe to avoid spam messages from being published. Thank you for understanding.

 
Karen Chace 2014 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

 

Monday, March 24, 2014

Unlock the Possibilities: Enhance Your Online Presence!


Created with Tagxedo
While preparing for a conference presentation, Enhance Your Online Presence, I sent a questionnaire to a large number of storytelling colleagues. I asked, “What is preventing you from writing a blog?” These are the top three answers I received:

1. No time

Indeed, blogging can be time consuming but that also depends on the subject and your writing style. Because most of my posts require
research, I spend approximately four to six hours on each subject, but I have also written and published a post within an hour. The choice is up to you.

The marketing hat is the most difficult one to wear but it is a necessary evil. Experts now say that potential customers must see your information at least 12 times before they remember you. If you are serious about engaging and maintaining a dialog with your clients and colleagues, a blog remains the strongest and most ideal platform.

2. Fear of the technology

You have all the time you need to design your template, choose the font, your color palette, decide what layout to use, you can even write your first blog post. Nothing will be visible to anyone until you hit the publish button. You are in control!

3. Nothing worthwhile to say


After I recovered from the shock of storytellers believing they had nothing to say, I comprised a short list of blog topics:


  • Share personal or professional experience
  • Turn a press release into a blog article
  • Ask and answer questions
  • Conduct an interview
  • Provide tutorials
  • Publish a list of links on a topic
  • Offer a list of ideas or trends

There are hundreds of ideas waiting to be selected.

“Blogging is good for your career. A well-executed blog sets
you apart as an expert in your field.”   -
Penelope Trunk

Blogs will:

  • sharpen your writing skills
  • build community
  • set you apart from the competition
  • demonstrate commitment and passion for your work
  • create your unique niche
  • allow you to share your knowledge and expertise
  • establish and manage your online reputation
  • increase your search engine rankings

My readers come from all over the world: Russia, Malaysia, Greece, South Korea, Thailand, Slovenia, Australia, England, Italy, Poland, China, Ireland, Taiwan, and the Netherlands, to name just a few. It is remarkable to realize the vast audiences we can reach through social media. However, this didn’t happen overnight. It took time, persistence and offering practical information so my readers will return again and again.

 “A blog is in many ways, a continuing conversation.” – Andrew Sullivan


I have forged some wonderful relationships and alliances through my blog, most notably with Bill Lampton, president of Championship Communications. He has featured me on his business blog, interviewed me on his radio show and included my work in his honor roll of Pinnacle Seekers . I've been invited to write for other publications, both nationally and internationally, in fact, this post is based on an article I wrote for a UK Storytelling Magazine. You never know where one connection will take you or how it will enhance your reputation, and work.

Would you like to take your business to the next level in a fun and accessible environment?  I invite you to spend time with me this Saturday, March 29, in my workshop, Enhance Your Online Presence: Blog It Baby! at the LANES Northeast Storytelling Conference in Amherst, MA. Then stay for Sunday’s workshop, Branding: It Doesn’t Have to Hurt! with me and my co-presenter, the knowledgeable Simon Brooks. Not only do we will give you the immediate tools to get your started, there will be additional offerings to take home to continue the process. Plus, we have chocolate! Details on the entire conference can be found at www.lanes.org .

By blogging and branding wisely you have the ability to take your business to the next level. I am a firm believer in the mantra “A rising tide floats all boats.” Why not begin to chart your own course this weekend by spending spend time with us!


Karen Chace 2014 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Sunday, March 23, 2014

March Goes Out Like a Lamb...Folktales and More to Celebrate Lambs and Spring

Young Girl with Lamb
by
Emile Munier, 1840-1895

At the beginning of March I shared a blog post with stories about lions, courtesy of the old adage, “March comes in like a lion, and goes out like a lamb.” While spring has finally arrived in the United States, you would never know it by the calendar.

Here in Massachusetts we are expecting a traditional Nor’easter this week, but instead of rain, they are predicting more snow. It looks like the area where I live may hit the jackpot, with over a foot of snow.

As they say in New England, “If you don’t like the weather, just wait a minute.”
So with that in mind, I will continue to think positive and offer you stories of lovely lambs who greet the world in springtime.





The Little Lamb – Italy
This is a lovely version of Cinderella, Italian style! I could only find it in _The Collected Sicilian Folk and Fairy Tales_ of Giuseppe Pitre by Jack Zipes courtesy Google Books.
http://tinyurl.com/mg6ztv2

The Little Lamb and the Little Fish
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/grimm141.html

The Sheep and the Pig Who Set Up House – Norway
http://oaks.nvg.org/ntales47.html#shepigous

The Sheep, the Lamb, the Wolf and the Hare – Tibet
http://members.home.nl/marcmarti/yugur/folktale/tale10b.htm


ACTIVITY

March Play: The Lion and the Lamb – An adorable, preschool activity based on the poem, _The Lion and the Lamb_.
http://www.brighthubeducation.com/preschool-crafts-activities/65462-lion-and-the-lamb-march-fingerplay/

ART

How to Draw a Lamb
http://www.wikihow.com/Draw-Lambs

BOOKS

Barnes and Noble: Children’s books about lambs and sheep.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/?category_id=904465

Best Books About Sheep for Pre-K Use
http://voices.yahoo.com/best-books-sheep-pre-k-classroom-use-11987912.html

CRAFTS

DLTK-Kids.com So many adorable lamb crafts: origami, puppets, masks and more.
http://www.dltk-kids.com/animals/lambs.htm

Allkidsnetwork.com – Easy, cotton ball lamb craft; too cute.
http://www.allkidsnetwork.com/crafts/animals/farm/sheep-craft.asp

CURRICULUM

You’re History – This story behind _Mary Had a Little Lamb_.
http://yourehistory.wordpress.com/2012/11/14/sheep-in-folktales-mary-had-a-little-lamb/

Lamb Themed Lesson Plans Ideas for Pre-K Educators
http://voices.yahoo.com/lamb-themed-lesson-plan-ideas-pre-k-educators-11987649.html?cat=7

First-School – Preschool activities and crafts.
http://www.first-school.ws/theme/animals/farm/lamb.htm

Preschool Express.com – Lesson plan for the little ones: art, number recognition, language, movement and more.
http://www.preschoolexpress.com/theme-station08/lambs-apr08.shtml

Sheep 101 – Information about different kinds of sheep, the history of sheep, what they eat and more.
http://www.sheep101.info/lambing.html

FINGERPLAY

Here Is The Barn 

Here is the barn (Form a roof shape with your hands)
Where I like to go (Walk in place)
It's as tall as a tree (Point up overhead)
And cozy, you know (Hug body with arms)

Here is the barn, (Make a roof shape with your hands)
I'll go there with you (Walk in place)
To pet a sweet lamb (Pretend to pet a lamb)
And cuddle it, too! (Pretend to hug a lamb)

GAME

Spoonful.com – Wolf and Sheep Tag
http://spoonful.com/family-fun/wolf-and-sheep-tag

SONGS


Baa Baa Black Sheep
by
Dorothy Wheeler, 1916
Mary Had a Little Lamb

Mary had a little lamb, little lamb, Mary had a little lamb,
Its fleece was white as snow,
Everywhere that Mary went, Mary went,
Everywhere that Mary went the lamb was sure to go.
It followed her to school one day, school one day,
It followed her to school one day, but that was against the rules.
It made the children laugh and play, laugh and play,
It made the children laugh and play, to see a lamb at school.


Baa Baa Black Sheep

Baa Baa Black sheep have you any wool.
Yes sir, yes sir, three bags full.
One for my master,
one for the dame,
and one for the little boy who lives down the lane.


Little Bo Peep

Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep and can’t tell where to find them,
Leave them alone and they will come home.
Wagging their tails behind them.


STORY STRETCH

I’m a Baby Lamb (To tune of: I’m a Little Teapot)
* I found this rhyme on http://fingerplays-b3ok.blogspot.com/2012/10/newborn-lamb.html and added the actions the action to turn it into a story stretch.


I'm a baby lamb (point to self)
just born today  (rock arms back and forth as if rocking a baby)
I want to run around and play  (turn around while stamping feet)
I am very hungry, I must eat (rub belly)
So I'll grow up big like my daddy sheep. (bend down as you begin this line then stand up and point to sky)


March Comes in Like a Lion…Folktales That Roar!
This link will lead you to the blog post I wrote at the beginning of March.
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2014/03/march-comes-in-like-lionfolktales-that.html

Two previous blog posts to welcome spring:

Birds, Bees and Butterflies
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/04/birds-bees-and-butterflies.html

Spring is Here! Make Way for Ducking’s
http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2012/04/spring-is-here-make-way-for-ducklings.html


Karen Chace 2014 ©

This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.

Friday, March 21, 2014

Stor e Telling: June July 2013

Lise Sewing
Renoir, 1866
Last year I undertook the project of placing all of my 2007-2012 Stor e Telling columns, from Storytelling Magazine on my blog. Now that 2014 is here I will begin to share all of my columns from 2013. I will not be adding current columns until the following year, so if you want immediate access to the newest websites, please consider becoming a member of the National Storytelling Network. 

Below are the sites I offered for the April/May 2013 issue. There are sites to complement the state of Virginia, location for the National Storytelling Conference in 2013, as well as sites to celebrate Thread the Needle Day, Adopt a Cat Month, Canada Day, Cow Appreciation and Yellow Pig Day, and two previous blogs to help you slide into summer!So much to celebrate and so little time! I hope you find something fun to tell!

American Folklore - Folklore from Virginia; a pour quoi Tale and two ghost stories await.

Richmond.gov  – Everything you need to know about Richmond; business, transportation, maps, tours, cultural events and more.
http://www.richmondgov.com/index.aspx

Tripadvisor.com
– Read about eighty-two different activities in Richmond, including museums, theater, landmarks, etc., and how other visitors have rated them.

http://tinyurl.com/c5ds5fp


Virginia Historical Society - The Story of Virginia, an American Experience“This award-winning exhibition interprets 16,000 years of Virginia history from the earliest artifacts of Native Americans to Virginia at the beginning of the 21st century. This online version allows you to explore the galleries through a new virtual tour.”
http://www.vahistorical.org/storyofvirginia.htm

Visitrichmondva.com – Another site to help you plan your trip, including restaurants that cater to groups, discount coupons, and a free visitor’s guide.
http://tinyurl.com/csexbw6

June is National Adopt a Cat Month and these stories will have you purring in no time at all!

The Boy Who Drew Cats – Japan
The Cat’s Elopement – Japan
http://tinyurl.com/cllzb9b
Cat and Mouse in Partnership - Germany
http://tinyurl.com/c8uzndv
Domingo’s Cat – South America
http://tinyurl.com/c3kpech
Why Cats and Dogs Never Get Along – Haiti

You will find these seven folktales at the link below, along with a few Aesop fables.

  • How Cat’s Got Their Purr – England
  • The Master Cat, or Puss n’ Boots - France
  • The White Cat - France
  • Kissa the Cat - Denmark
  • The Lion and the Cat - England
  • The Cottager and His Cat - Iceland
  • The Clever Cat - Iran
http://tinyurl.com/c6uu7jv

Twelve different stories about cats from Nigeria, Palestine, Tibet and other countries around the world.
http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/cat.html


July 1 is Canada Day. Here are some tales to celebrate our friends to the north.

Canadian Fairy Tales by Cyrus Macmillan. Twenty-six folktales published in 1922.

Canadian Folklore Twenty-four stories to add to your repertoire.

Canadian Wonder Tales by Cyrus Macmillan, 1918. Find out How Summer Came to Canada, meet The Boy and His Three Helpers, The Duck with the Red Feet and many more.

Since the beaver is Canada’s national symbol I offer you some tales to celebrate our furry friend.

Native American Beaver Mythology

Turtle Races With Beaver

July 25 is Thread the Needle Day; here are some stories to help you “stitch” a story together!

Baba Yaga – Russia
http://tinyurl.com/brv2dkv

Last Darning Needle – USA
 
The Darning Needle - England

Spindle, Shuttle and Needle – German

The Tsarevna Frog - Russia

The Wasp, the Winged Needle and the Spider - Brittany


July also brings us Cow Appreciation Day and Yellow Pig Day. Here is a blog post on Barnyard Animals from 2012, which includes stories, curriculum, songs and crafts.

Down on the Farm – Animal Stories
http://tinyurl.com/bofaktq

Two additional blog posts to help you slide into summer!

Birds, Bees and Butterflies

Slide Into Summer with Skits, Stories and Songs
The link below will take you to all of the Stor e Telling blog posts, with synopses, from my 2007-2012 columns for the national Storytelling Magazine.


http://karenchace.blogspot.com/2013/12/stor-e-telling-columns-2007-to-2012.html

Let
me know if you find this useful; I love to hear from you! Please note that if you comment on the blog below it will not appear until I allow it to be published. Sadly, I had to implement that fail safe to avoid spam messages from being published. Thank you for understanding.






Karen Chace 2014 ©
This blog post was researched and compiled by Karen Chace. Permission for private use is granted. Distribution, either electronically or on paper is prohibited without my expressed written permission. For permission please contact me at storybug@aol.com. Of course, if you wish to link to my blog via your website, blog, newsletter, Facebook page or Twitter please feel free to do so; I greatly appreciate your support and personal integrity.